Preperations and Quick walkthrough

 
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Preperations
Before you can start using Amiga911 Maker for creating boot disks and/or A911Extras packs, you must of course download and extract the Amiga911 Maker archive first.  The distribution does now include an installer tool which can be used for installing or updating Amiga911 Maker, and it can also be used for installing a suitable version of LZX to your system as well (optional). But you can of course still install manually if you prefer that. When it comes to the location, you can decide for yourself exactly where you want the program, but it's really recommended that you don't bury it too deep in the directory structure of your harddisk. Amiga911 Maker is made so that it can be used without having to install any extra files, but if you want to install these files anyway, you can find instructions in the documentation that follows the distribution.

When you are done, you will have a directory called Amiga911 Maker which contains some files and the following sub-dirs:

A911MakerData - contains the Amiga911 Maker program data + some other files and pre-made file archives that will be used for making the boot disk. You shouldn't have to worry about most of the stuff in here.
 
Projects - this drawer will contain all projects you create with Amiga911 Maker, each project will consist of a sub-dir having the name you entered when you first created the project. This dir is empty by default.
 
Resources - all required files that you have to download must be copied into this drawer, you don't have to extract the archives first since everything will be handled by Amiga911 Maker.


Inside the Resources drawer there's now a couple of new archives called A911-ProgramsA.lha and A911-ProgramsB.lha, which contains all major files of the various Programs that can be added to the projects you create. This means you no longer have to download anything extra, since these two archives will now be used as sources for the programs you add. That being said, any existing program archives will still have priority over the two new ones, here is an example:  If NewFilemaster.lha is present in the Resources drawer, it will be preferred over A911-ProgramsA.lha.

There's also a new A911-USBstacks.lha archive in the Resources drawer as well. This file contains the most essential Anaiis and Poseidon USB stack files, which are used by Amiga911 Maker for adding USB support to the boot disks created. Currently, it will have priority over any Poseidon lha archive found in the Resources dir, while Anaiis.lha will still have first priority.



Quick walkthrough
This section contains a really quick walkthrough of Amiga911 Maker, where just the basic usage of the program is explained. For more detailed instructions, I will recommend that you read the main tutorials instead. As mentioned above, Amiga911 Maker is a projects based program, which means that creating a boot disk or A911Extras pack always starts off with first making a new project. When this is done, there are three main steps involved with creating the disk/pack (as described below).  If you later find out that something needs to be changed on the boot disk or pack, you can simply just open the old project in Amiga911 Maker, do the required changes, and finally create a new disk/pack to replace the old one.


The following assumes that you want to make an Amiga911 boot disk. As for the two other project types, read the additional comments at the bottom of this page.

You must first create a new project by clicking the "New" button in Amiga911 Makers window, then you must select what type of project to be created, this can currently be either an Amiga911 boot disk, A911Extras disk/drawer or an Emergency Disk II. Make your selection by clicking the correct button, and a new small window will appear.

Now you must enter a name for your new project, and then select the AmigaOS version to be supported. If the disk you want to create is to be used on a Amiga with less than 2MB RAM you have to enable the "Create Low-Mem disk" option, but if the Amiga has 2MB or more RAM you should leave this option disabled.
If you enabled the "Create Low-Mem disk" option,there will not be much space left for anything extra on the resulting floppy disk since the majority of files won't be included in the LZX archives. But if you also enable the "Use XPK compression" option as well, most of the files in question will be XPK crunched instead - thus leading to more free space on the disk.

Press the OK button when you are finished.

Inside the Projects directory there should now be a new dir having the name you previously entered, the only thing to be found inside this new dir right now is a small file called "A911Project" which holds the settings for your project.


Now there are three main steps involved with creating a boot disk:


Step 1: Configure system & Configure programs
Here you can configure various settings and what kind of system files you want included on the disk. In the Configure programs section you can select what programs that shall be included on the floppy. After you have selected the programs you want, it might be a good idea to press the "Check" button to see if you have all the required files. If you get a message saying that no files needs to be downloaded, just press the "OK" button, otherwise a window which contains a list over files that needs to be downloaded will pop up. This list can be copied to the clipboard or it can be saved as a text or html file. You will then have to download and copy all missing files to the "Resources" dir.


Step 2: Copy system files & Copy program files
This will start copying system and program files to your project, you will need a suitable Workbench disk for this. The copying of program files requires that you already have downloaded all needed files first. After the copying is finished, the main directory of your project should now include four (or five) new dirs:

Amiga911 - All files inside this directory are the ones that will end up on the Amiga911 disk.

System0 - Contains various patch files that requires a reboot upon booting the floppy. *

System1 - Contains the main system files, everything that is needed when booting the disk is included here. **

System2 - Contains secondary files that are not really needed on startup, examples of this includes filesystems, device drivers and files that are required by the programs you have added to your project (like libraries and stuff).

Programs - All programs that you want to be added to your project are included in this dir.

*  This directory is somewhat optional.
** If you previously configured your project to be a Low-Mem disk, the majority of files in the C & Libs dir will be in the Amiga911 directory instead. Most of these files will be XPK crunched if this option was selected upon creating the project, otherwise they won't be compressed in any way!



Step 3: Create archives & Create disk
This will create three/four archives containing some of the files that was copied in Step 2, these archives which will appear in the "Amiga911" dir are:

System0.lzx - Contains all files in the "System0" directory. *

System1.lzx - Contains all files in the "System1" directory.

System2.lzx - Contains all files in the "System2" directory.

Programs.lzx - Contains all files in the "Programs" directory.

*  This archive will only be created if the System0 dir exists.


This section will also XPK crunch some files if you have previously configured your project to do this.

The Create disk section will first format a floppy disk with FFS called "Amiga911" and then install it (making it bootable) afterwards. When this is done, all files & dirs that are inside the Amiga911 dir will be copied to the floppy disk.



A911Extras disk/drawer
Creating the A911Extras disk/drawer is basically done in the same way as the Amiga911 boot disk, but there are some differences: Unlike a Amiga911 project which contains a System1, System2, Programs & Amiga911 drawer, there will only be one drawer in a A911Extras project, and that drawer is quite simply called A911Extras. Currently the only compression used, is on the disk version where certain executable files are imploder crunched. Other tnan that, there are no sort of file compression/crunching involved on this type of project. Another thing is that if A911Extras is created as a floppy disk, it will not be bootable.

You start off by clicking the "New" button in Amiga911 Makers window, and then the "A911Extras disk/drawer" button. This will cause another small window to appear, where you must edit some project details like the name and AmigaOS version to be supported (2.x or 3.x). You must also select if A911Extras should be a Disk or a Drawer, and if the latter is chosen, the "Create disk" button in Amiga911 Maker's window changes name to "Export drawer".  Now you can continue with performing Step 1: Configure system & Configure programs, and then Step 2: Copy system files & Copy program files.

When all of this is done, you can just perform Step 3 by clicking the Create disk or the Export drawer button in Amiga911 Maker. The former will first format a floppy disk with FFS called "A911Extras", and then all files & dirs that are inside the A911Extras dir will be copied to the floppy disk. The latter will first open a directory requestor which allows you to choose the export location, then the entire A911Extras drawer with contents will be copied to the selected destination directory.



Emeregency Disk II
Creating the Emergency DiskII floppy is more or less done in the same way as the Amiga911 boot disk, the main diffrences is that your project will contain a EDisk drawer instead of Amiga911, and that you will need an AmigaOS 3.9 CD (or other media) since a few copyrighted files needs to be copied from it.

To begin, just click the "New" button in Amiga911 Makers window, and then the "Emergency Disk II" button.  In the small window that now appears, you must enter the name of your new project. Unlike the two other project types, there is nothing more to edit here, so just hit the OK button.  Now you can continue with performing Step 1: Configure system & Configure programs, and then Step 2: Copy system files & Copy program files.

After the copying is finished, the main directory of your project should now include five new dirs (where some are a bit different than in Amiga911 projects):

EDisk - All files inside this directory are the ones that will end up on the Emergency Disk II.

System0 - Contains various patch files that requires a reboot upon booting the floppy, this includes the SetPatch and "AmigaOS ROM Update" files.

System1 - Contains everything required for mounting various devices (like CD-ROM drives).

System2 - Contains system files used by Workbench + various files that's required by the programs you have added to your project (like libraries and stuff).

Programs - All programs that you want to be added to your project are included in this dir.


Now you can continue with Step 3: Create archives & Create disk.  The former will make the three SystemX.lzx + Programs.lzx archives, and put them in the EDisk drawer (just like with Amiga911 projects). The latter will first format a floppy disk with FFS called "E-Disk-II" and then install it (making it bootable) afterwards. When this is done, all files & dirs that are inside the EDisk dir will be copied to the floppy disk.





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